27 July 2022 − IADC is proud to announce eleven nominations in the running to receive the Safety Award 2022. IADC will announce two nominations every week, starting from 27 July, 2022. The winner will be announced on 15 September 2022.

3rd nomination: NMDC − Improved training programme

In a step to improve safety, NMDC customised 10 in-house training programmes and became the first dredging company to be accredited by ANSI National Accreditation Board (ANAB) for the training content it developed.

 

Project description

Since the dredging industry requires specific HSE information to be delivered to the workforce, NMDC developed customised training programmes based on the lessons learned from incidents, unsafe observations and health and safety data from internal and external sources.

New material for 10 in-house training programmes was developed to include information related to the dredging industry. In addition, the company sent 13 HSE staff to follow the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Train the Trainer course to gain accreditation from a world-leading accredited training body. ANSI was also asked to audit the entire training process including resources, trainers and course content before they accredited the 10 programmes to ensure that all the required steps were fulfilled.

The company’s 13 Train the Trainers are all from different nationalities with different dredging backgrounds to ensure the competency and understanding of its entire workforce. NMDC knows that by providing effective and comprehensive training programmes, employee’s knowledge and skills systematically improve.

NMDC became the first dredging company to be accredited by ANSI National Accreditation Board (ANAB) for the training content it developed. Over the last 3 years, the training programmes have resulted in a reduction of incident individual factors by 50%.


2nd nomination: Van Oord − Inspection hatch

Van Oord’s new system uses a cantilever to allow the inspection hatch to be operated by a single person. The design enables quick inspections, making it less labour intensive and removes the need for lifting equipment.

 

Project description

Opening an inspection hatch in a suction line towards the pump is a frequent activity. Originally a bolted hatch, the opening of an inspection hatch is labour intensive. First, several nuts and bolts need to be loosened before lifting gear is then used to remove the hatch. After inspection, the same routine has to be carried out to close the hatch and enable dredging activities to continue.

Van Oord came up with a design to improve the existing bolted hatch to enable quick inspections, making the process less labour intensive and eliminating the need for lifting equipment. The new system uses a cantilever to allow the inspection hatch to be operated by a single person. It eliminates the need to use power tools to loosen nuts and bolts as well as the necessity to operate lifting gear, for example a deck crane, for removal and installation of the hatch.

The innovative application of this idea in this environment is both creative and unique; the use of this kind of cantilever in the suction line environment on board a vessel is not done at this scale and size of suction lines. The inspection hatch is currently installed on the suction pipe of Van Oord’s new vessel, Vox Arianne. Extremely easy to use, the design can in principle be copied straight onto other vessels.


1st nomination: Boskalis − ‘Robin Hood manhole cover’

Boskalis has designed the Robin Hood; a manhole cover that can be opened and closed during repair periods while preventing water ingress and enabling continuous ventilation of the tank.

 

Project description

During repairs to vessels, which can take multiple days, the manhole covers on the weather decks need to be opened for tank inspections and ventilation. Usually, when it starts raining, a cement barrier is placed around the manhole to prevent water and dirt from flowing into the confined space, and the opening is covered up. Often, this is not done however, resulting in the need for someone to go into the confined space to clean it.

To find a solution to this problem, Boskalis designed the Robin Hood; a manhole cover that can be opened and closed while preventing water ingress and enabling continuous ventilation of the tank. By using the Robin Hood, the tank stays clean during the repair period and the need for people to enter into the potentially dangerous area is limited to the bare necessity. When necessary, air hoses for forced ventilation of the confined space can be inserted between the bars of the manhole cover. As a result, the Robin Hood can still be closed (and opened), reducing the risk of confined space accidents.

Made from aluminium, the Robin Hood can be made to fit every type of tank cover. The cover is lockable when in the opened position to prevent it from falling shut. When in the closed position it both ensures proper ventilation while closing off access and preventing water ingress. Its durable material also means it can be used for many years.


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