Challenges of optical backscatter monitoring in mixed sediment environments
Challenges of optical backscatter monitoring in mixed sediment environments

Popular instruments in the field, optical backscatter instruments (OBS) are used to measure suspended sediments. The sensitivity of OBS measurements in relation to grain size and the applicability of OBS measurements in mixed sediment environments is analysed.

Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure
Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure

The book Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure gives state-of-the-art guidance on how to design, implement and manage a water infrastructure project with a dredging component to project owners, regulators, consultants, designers and contractors.

Is high quality sediment monitoring worth its weight in gold?
Is high quality sediment monitoring worth its weight in gold?

Dredging activities often result in the suspension of sediment into the water column in the vicinity of the activity. Sediment release to the aquatic environment and the effects of this release are often the prime environmental concern associated with dredging.

Turbidity & Dredging

“Facts About Turbidity & Dredging” describes the characteristics of turbidity and the importance of measuring and monitoring turbidity during dredging.

Long-Term Effects of Maintenance Dredging on Turbidity
Long-Term Effects of Maintenance Dredging on Turbidity

Maintenance dredging is required in many estuaries worldwide to provide access to ports and inland waterways. A newly developed dredging module is able to capture the two fundamental processes necessary to model the long-term impacts of dredging on turbidity.

Turbidity
Turbidity

Turbidity is a leading factor in causing underwater disturbances to marine life and must be minimised and monitored during a dredging project.

Dredging in New Caledonia at a Unesco-IUCN World Heritage Site with Care for Nature
Dredging in New Caledonia at a Unesco-IUCN World Heritage Site with Care for Nature

Dredging for a new port complex in a remarkable, protected marine environment required adherence to very specific thresholds and an intensive Environmental Management Plan (EMP) that included mobile monitoring as well as daily visual observations of turbidity levels around the dredging works and the disposal zone.