The impact and costs of Building with Nature projects

The use of nature and natural processes is an innovative way to increase water safety and create added value through nature development and recreation. This exploratory study provides an initial inventory of the impact and costs of existing Building with Nature projects in the Netherlands. It also includes an analysis of the decision-making process in choosing this type of project and identifies success factors. Building with Nature projects deliver added value but often also involve additional costs compared to traditional reinforcements. These costs give an indication of what we as a society are prepared to pay for the development of nature and recreation as part of hydraulic engineering projects.

Presentation: ‘Hondsbossche and Pettemer Sea Defence an example of sustainable asset valuatio’ by Sven Kramer (Van Oord) − Director Sustainability

This presentation shows the practical implications of taking all externalities into consideration as early as possible in a project procedure. It is complex but asset valuation is gradually becoming more and more feasible for large infrastructure projects. The independent International Institute of Sustainable Development carried out a study on the benefits of “Nature Based” coastal Protection compared to traditional “Grey” solutions. Their report is expected to be published mid-November 2021.

Presentation: ‘Sand as a Resource’ by Jan Fordeyn (Jan De Nul) − Director Project Development & Conceptual Design

In our day to day lives most of us are not aware of how many industries rely on sand as a part of their working process. The amount of sand consumed has dramatically increased over the last few years and this can be largely contributed to the world wide construction boom. How is this going to affect us in the future?

Report: Financing of Sustainable Marine and Freshwater Infrastructure

A joint study to explore financing of green coastal, river and port projects. Solutions are available, have been tested and are economically viable.

Balancing project progress and limited system knowledge in Amatique Bay

The development of a new marine project demands a system approach in which all aspects, including technical, economic, environmental and social, are considered and integrated equally and at an early stage. While insufficient information may be available to make informed decisions, choices need to be made to progress a project, assess impacts and risks, and engage stakeholders. This article explores the case of a new port terminal in Amatique Bay, Guatemala. A method was developed to assess, at an early stage, the potential negative impacts on seagrass habitats from the disposal of dredged material at different locations, while having limited real-time and location-specific information at hand.

The importance of sustainability in dredging

In this webinar, the topic of sustainability in dredging will be linked to the Saly Coastal Protection Project in Senegal.

Coastbusters: A nature-based solutions coastal management alternative

Taking a fresh look at traditional, unsustainable coastal defence methods. A pioneering project discovers some inspiring concepts, including using biogenic reefs for ecosystem-based flood defence.

Interview with Dr Todd Bridges

‘It’s clear that the solutions that we employed in our approach to engineering in the 20th century are not aging well.’ As National Lead for the Engineering With Nature initiative, Dr Todd Bridges discusses how we must have a diversified solution set in which nature is a part of the solution.